Tangled Web

Book by Eric Mead ($40.00)

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Tangled Web - magic

The world has been waiting for a book by Eric Mead for a long time and this is it. Mead is a fantastic bar magician who worked on alternating nights at the famous Tower Magic Bar in Snowmass, CO for 14 years (the other magician, of course, was Doc Eason). The Tower closed in April 2004 and Eric is now busy working corporate events.

This is a charming little hard back book. It's small in dimensions, but big in page count. Within the 240 pages you'll find some great bar magic, close-up magic, strolling magic, stage magic, mentalism and even a couple of things for kids. But, I think the things that you'll take away the most will come from the essays. In particular, Mead's essay on Vernon's "Trick That Cannot Be Explained" is a must-read for anyone who has ever experimented with Vernon's trick.

To sum up, it's worth quoting Teller from his introduction to the book: "There is no bullshit, not a nugget, between these covers. If you're like me, you'll emerge changed, inspired, tingling." A magic book that makes you tingle ... how can it not get the Vanishing Inc seal of approval?!

Pages 260 - Hardcover.

 

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Customer reviews for Tangled Web

Isaac Dawson

I received this in the post only a week or so ago but have not been able to put it down since.

Beginning from the outside inwards, the book is beautifully designed. The lightly embossed hardcover with delicate foil printing looks fantastic, the paper quality is excellent and there is even a bound ribbon bookmark.

The introduction, by Teller, sets the bar high and correctly asserts that what follows will both change and inspire. Sure enough, it does.

Rather than analyse each chapter and effect, I will pick out my two favourite aspects, one general and the other more specific.

First, the style in which the book is written not only makes it wholly readable but enjoyable, gripping and intriguing. Mr Mead's style is opinionated which may not suit everyone but made me think more carefully about what I present and how I present it. This approach was particular effective when the author delves into the issue of mingling with people whom you have not previously met (this section alone is worth the price of the book twice over). This leads me back to the style in which the book is written. The format is not trick-explanation-trick-explanation-essay, rather, it takes a logical path, as a novel would. 'The Approach' is dealt with early on and effects are integrated into the narrative in appropriate places.

The more specific part of the book that I would like to highlight is the chapter, 'Jazz Charts and Favorite Licks' which covers Dai Vernon's 'The Trick That Cannot Be Explained'. Calling from the experience he gained as a bar magician in Aspen, the chapter explores the unexplainable trick through presentational approaches, preparations and possible 'outs'. If you are unaware of 'The Trick That Cannot Be Explained', interested in learning more or are already well versed in using it, I challenge anyone not to benefit from reading what is said in these pages.

This book has already become a staple in my collection and I'm sure it will for anyone else who reads it as well.