The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back

Book by Jonathan Friedman ($24.95)

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"The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back" - Volume One , with an introduction by David Regal, is the first of a two-part series featuring 22 incredible effects and highly entertaining presentations from the slightly off-kilter mind of Jonathan Friedman. Filled with quirky, visual, and 'retro-istic' flair, Friedman's collection of magic is just as much fun to read for pure pleasure as it is to learn from. Every routine includes a full, audience-tested and approved script, a large number of easy-to-follow photographs, and enough raw mystery and entertainment value to really take your magic to another dimension.

Along with Jonathan Friedman's own special brand of magic, this book features wonderful guest contributions from a powerhouse crew of some of close up magic's most respected names, including John Guastaferro, Cameron Francis, Francis Menotti, Steve Mayhew, Joe Cole, and Shaun Dunn!

"The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back"-Volume One will have you cutting keys with fire and ink! You will be using pretzels to divine a selected card! You will be popping a piece of 'corn inside your bare hands! How about levitating a card case with no wires, magnets, or magic strings? Throwing guitar picks into the deck to find a card like a rock star? Freshly written ink that changes and morphs right before your eyes?

Yes, all of this and so much more is possible when you read "The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back"-Volume One!

At over 240 pages, with photographs overflowing, this beautiful soft-cover book is available for the "Back To The Eighties" low, low price of $24.95.

Dust off your Flux Capacitor and take a look at what some of magic's best and brightest are saying about "The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back"-Volume One" by Jonathan Friedman.

"A treat to read. It's filled with commercial, practical and best of all FUN tricks."
- Jay Sankey

"This is seriously solid new magic imbued and described with a sense of fun"
- Curtis Kam

"Highly commercial and compelling magic that won't disappoint. This has something for everybody."
- Jack Carpenter

"Strong novel effects + silly amusing presentations."
- Stephen Minch

 

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Customer reviews for The 80's Called...They Want Their Magic Book Back

Official review from MAGIC Magazine

From the August 2015 MAGIC Magazine. Reviewed by Jared Kopf

Magicians invented quirky magic in the late ’70s and early ’80s, and they published their creations in quirky magic books. The movement, led primarily by that wonderful seeker of astonishment Paul Harris, focused on offbeat methods, eccentric presentations, and packet tricks. Take one look at The Incredible Tap Dancing Aces from Las Vegas Close-Up [1978] and you’ll see what I’m getting at. Then, read the entire book. When you put it down, you won’t be the same.
Only a few other magic books have had a similar first impression on me, and I didn’t expect to find anything quite like it again. But then I read Jonathan Friedman’s new book, The ’80s Called… They Want Their Magic Book Back.
If this book were a magician, it would be wearing stone-washed denim flares and a slogan T-shirt. Instead, it’s wrapped in a black perfect binding with its title emblazoned in a powder-blue to hotpink rainbow font, which appears to have been written by the same artist who designed the album cover of Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

On the back, we find a photo of the author staring pensively through Erik Estrada’s sunglasses. “Go on, read it,” he seems to say. “It’s going to be fun.”
The opening trick, Wannabe Ninja, perfectly sets the tone of the book. This trick is more like a routine in itself, a barrage of effects that leads to a version of the Benzais/Lorayne effect Stabbed in the Pack.

This trick might be as fun to perform as Harris’ pun-filled Vacuum Cleaner Cards [ Super Magic, 1977]. Here, Friedman recommends that the reader vocalize “various Kung-Fu sound effects and hiyah’s” as the trick is performed.
Having established his playful voice, Friedman goes on to explain a variety of strange pieces. If you were ever enticed to buy a Paul Harris collection because you knew you would find magic with chocolate bars and houseplants, then you will love that Friedman will teach you to conjure with guitar picks, keys, popcorn kernels, plasticware, and pretzels. Even if you never actually perform a single effect from this book, you will never be able to say it wasn’t an interesting read.
The work of Friedman’s contributors rounds out what is already an impressive collection of material. Cameron Francis gives his postmodern version of Vernon’s Travelers, which classical card magicians will enjoy. Francis Menotti’s excellent This is Real shows the blurry overlap of illusion and reality with Telleresque gravitas. And there are some fine card effects from John Guastaferro, Shaun Dunn, Steve Mayhew, and Joe Cole.

The ’80s Called is a delightful magic book. It’s ironic without being flippant; nostalgic without being sappy. Friedman shows that he can have a great time and still cite his sources like an academic. And best of all, by including “Volume One” in the title, he hints that there’s more magic to come.