Redivider

Book by Phil Goldstein ($15.00)

In stock. Order in the next 8 hours, 55 minutes and it will go out today!
Customer rating:

Redivider - magic

Redivider is a booklet containing 24 tricks and routines with cards. All of the routines pivot around one principle: palindromic stacks (also known as mirror stacks or reflected stacks, in some circles). While still not widely known, Rusduck's Stay-Stack is probably the most famous output from this interesting genre of card magic.

The effects aren't really flashly, knuckle-busters, but instead they are interesting because they apply clever methodological principles to interesting, lofty plots. Many of the effects have full routines and presentations and they're all easy to do.

Given that it's such a small genre of card magic that it is quite acceptable for you to have never experimented with palindromic stacks. If you like the work of Alex Elmsley, Stewart James, Persi Diaconis, Roy Walton, Peter Duffie et all, then I think you'd like what Goldstein has to offer.

This is a small book that you'll likely enjoy in one or two sittings. It is definitely a fun read and we're happy to recommend it to you.

Pages 80 - Softbound

 

Interested in Redivider? You may also like:

 
Write a review

Customer reviews for Redivider

Dr. Joaquin Ayala

I have never really been a hardcore mentalist, but I do love the genre. My biggest influence in said genre has always been Max Maven (Phil Goldstein), and it started with his Videomind series (I got them when VHS was king).

This book is a veritable treasure trove of material, all based on the same idea and principle. There is a little bit of remembering which routine uses what moves and which way, but it is not a memorization issue. It is very easy to understand and pick up. As a matter of fact, if you have ever more than dabbled in mentalism and used cards for any effects, you already know of at least one variation on the principle covered in this book. There are a lot of magician-foolers in this book, but there is also a lot of metalist-fooling material in it as well. That was not necessarily the intended effect, but because (at least that I have heard/noticed) this is not a book that has been read by a wide spread of performers, it ended up being so. I rather like that though...

The work and the history of the principle is well detailed, and there is plenty of room of reworking the presentational angle of each of the routines to make it your own, or to suit your needs. Even if you do not perform mentalist per se, there is still something for everyone in here - even magicians who do card work with a gambling theme.